Reach and Learn Through Time and Place

Description

This workshop is a National Laboratory for educational learning within our new project “Nonviolent European Resistance” – Europe for Citizens: European remembrance. 
The workshop aims to educate and provide students with a non-violent education that shares past and present.

To whom is dedicated this workshop

Any young person aged 21-36 who is encouraged to learn stories and experiences of peacebuilding can apply to this learning workshop. As a young person these days, you will be able to learn and increase your nonviolent knowledge skills and share with others what it means to live in peace, and have the right to express your decision-making process while remembering the past.

Education team and staff in the workshops

Our educators, teachers, and staff are here to guide and present this memorable new learning experience that will strengthen your present as it connects you to the past.

What you will learn

Are you interested and motivated to learn about our Holocaust Education Workshops?

Topics: Lessons of the Holocaust and Anti-Semitism

Welcome to our Museum of tolerance. In these workshops, educators, counselors, family members, students, and young people discuss the challenges of nonviolent youth resistance in World War II; the role of women, the role of caregivers, and the resistance of the vulnerable. The key depth of this workshop is to discuss and learn about the role of teachers, students, and educators from the violent past and to link peaceful education today. Sharing, talking and learning will give you empathy to open your horizons promoting education in a peaceful society. We will read letters from soldiers, pay tribute to all of these people, ongoing commitment, honor, and express gratitude for those who suffered in the past.

Classroom

The workshops will be held through our Virtual Classroom and are an opportunity to meet a small number of your education service. The minimum start of the workshops with 10 young participants is to encourage learners to actively a collaborative process for common challenges, while our educators and staff will guide you through new learning inputs.

During this lesson, we will show, tell, and discuss how you can promote activity when learning as a young person and connect with youth educators.

The workshop will be in English.

Who Can Attend? 

Educators, teachers, counselors, youth workers, young people, and students.

How can I apply?

Registration is open to students and young people 21-36 years old.
Please send us your details, such as your full name, age, date of birth, email address, and phone number at youth-alexis.org@worker.com with the subject line “Reach and Learn Through Time and Place” or call us at 1-856-800 -1683 or by filling out the form available at youth-alexis.org/workshops.

Platform

Our workshops will be held in Zoom or Free Conference Call platforms.

Schedule

The workshop schedule is shown below with 72 hours in full.

The activity of the workshop is to start:

  • January 11th to January 15th, 2021
  • January 18th to January 22th, 2021

Deadline

The registration deadline is December 18th, 2020.
The selection of participants will be announced by December 21st, 2020.

Educators

Our respected staff and education team will be guiding participants through the working process at these workshops.

Certification

At the end of the classroom for the learning workshop, each participant will be provided with a certificate of completion.

Half-Day Agenda of the activities

Objective Notes

Rationale 9:00 a.m. – 15 minutes

Soft Start

Have the sentence stems listed below posted on chart paper at the front of the room. During the first ten minutes while participants are settling in, ask them to jot down responses to any of the stems that seem relevant to them. These responses will be used in the “conversation starter below.”

During the last five minutes or so, do a quick check-in with participants. For example, ask each participant to share a word or phrase that sums up his or her day so far.

Participants will transition from their previous duties and focus on building new knowledge. A welcoming environment with refreshments helps to set the stage.

9:15 a.m. – 15 minutes

What is my entry point to standards-based means to live in peace and nonviolence in the classroom in the past and present?

10:00 a.m. – 45 minutes

How have these four myths impacted my thinking about peace arts assessment?

Peace education: The Four Myths of nonviolent Assessment

Divide participants into four groups and ask each group to read and discuss one of the four myths about arts assessment. Provide each group with chart paper and markers. Explain that each group will create a  poster to present to the group. Each poster should synthesize the group’s understanding of the myth and “bust” the myth by providing a wealth of examples drawn from the participants’ own experiences.

The groups will have twenty minutes to read and discuss their myth and create their poster. Each group will have two minutes for an engaging and thought-provoking poster presentation. After all four presentations, lead a discussion with the whole group based on this section’s essential questions.

10:45 a.m. – 30 minutes

What can I learn about arts assessment from my colleagues’ examples?

Gallery Walk: Art and culture for youth and peace Assessment Tools

This section offers a variety of participant and student assessment tools. Have all participants quickly scan the four pages. Ask each participant to think of as many good examples of these kinds of assessments that they have used or seen others use. Put each good assessment example on a large Post-It note.

Have each of the words on a piece of chart paper posted around the room:

  • Rubrics
  • Observations
  • Performance
  • Portfolio
  • Processfolio
  • Journal
  • Portfolio
  • Peer critiques

Ask participants to post their notes on the appropriate chart and then give participants time to walk by the charts and look at the assessment examples.

Conversation Starter

In these workshops, educators, counselors, family members, students, and young people discuss the challenges of nonviolent youth resistance in World War II; the role of women, the role of caregivers, and the resistance of the vulnerable. The key depth of this workshop is to discuss and learn about the role of teachers, students, and educators from the violent past and to link peaceful education today. Sharing, talking and learning will give you empathy to open your horizons promoting education.

Gallery Walk

Arts Assessment Tools for nonviolence

This section offers a variety of participant and student assessment tools. Have all participants quickly scan the four pages. Ask each participant to think of as many good examples of these kinds of assessments that they have used or seen others use. Put each good assessment example on a large Post-It note.

Have each of the words on a piece of chart paper posted around the room:

  • Rubrics
  • Observations
  • Performance
  • Portfolio
  • Processfolio
  • Journal
  • Portfolio
  • Peer critiques

Ask participants to post their notes on the appropriate chart and then give participants time to walk by the charts and look at the assessment examples.

Timing: As noted, the workshop could be divided into three one-hour sessions or two one-and-a-half hour sessions. Be sure to allow time for a warm-up activity at the beginning of each session.

Making past and present connection

11:15 a.m. – 30 minutes

What does arts assessment look like at the district level? What could it look like in our school or district?

Imagine…

District Arts Assessment

Planning an Arts Education Assessment System in Your District.

Use your laptop and computer projector to walk participants through the three examples of large-scale arts assessment.

Ask participants to work with a partner for this next activity. Using the planning guidelines as a resource, ask each pair to brainstorm their own plan for a large-scale arts assessment project at their school or district. For the purpose of this exercise, imagine that there are no barriers of time, money, or qualified personnel to implement these plans! What would it take to make this dream a reality? Give each pair 30 seconds to share their brainstorm and thumbnail implementation plan with the whole group.

This activity will focus participants on what it might be possible to implement in their own school or district using three concrete examples and a detailed planning process.

Encourage participants to let their imagination run wild without getting bogged down with barriers to their plans.

Reflection activity at the end of each session.

Session One (60 min.) Session Two (60 min.) Session Three (60 min.)

Session One (90 min.) Session Two (90 min.)

Nondiscrimination Policy

Youth Alexis is committed to a work environment in which all individuals are treated with respect and dignity. Each individual has the right to work in a professional atmosphere that promotes equal employment opportunities and prohibits unlawful discriminatory practices, including harassment. Therefore, Youth Alexis expects that all relationships among persons in the office and online will be business-like and free of explicit bias, prejudice, and harassment.

Welcome

Disability Services (DS) coordinates services and arranges program adjustments for young people and students with disabilities at Youth Alexis. The DS Office provides reasonable accommodations to ensure physical and programmatic access to services, programs, and activities.

We serve young people, students, and educators with a wide variety of visible and invisible disabilities including but not limited to:

  • Migraines
  • ADD/ADHD
  • Seizures
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Dyslexia/Dysgraphia
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Traumatic Brain Injuries
  • Hearing Loss
  • Diabetes and other medical conditions

Living with cancer

If I have cancer, how can I protect myself?

We all need to be vigilant and faithful in our practice of social distancing during this pandemic. This is particularly important for patients with cancer. Here are a few tips for reducing your risk of exposure to COVID-19:

  1. Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of COVID-19 infection and contact your physician if you develop symptoms suggestive of COVID-19 infection.
  2. Practice social distancing. Stay at home and avoid person-to-person contact as much as possible. Avoid travel, social gatherings, handshakes, and contact with those who may be ill.
  3. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  4. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before eating or touching your face and after coming into contact with others.

Requesting Services

To receive services, students complete an intake appointment in the Disability Services office and provide documentation of disability. Individualized program adjustments will then be determined. Please note some services may require more weeks or more to arrange.

Youth Alexis will make every effort to ensure that the lack of English skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in education programs.

Summary of Current Status

Workshops and classes will be held online, virtually such as Zoom or any other similar teleconference or conference meeting space, and for any other support. You can also connect with our services by phone and email.